Matriarchy Does Not Exist

Matriarchy does not exist. Apparently, it has never existed. Anthropologists can’t find a single example of it.

Most anthropologists hold that there are no known anthropological societies that are unambiguously matriarchal, but some authors believe exceptions may exist or may have.

There are very male-dominant patriarchies, where women may be forbidden to vote or own property. And there are situations where women take an almost equal role with men, which is common today. But, there has been no society where women lead and men follow.

Feminists today will no doubt claim: “Because, nobody thought of it!” Oh, in all of the history of civilization, there has never been a woman who seeks power over men? Even when a woman is in power, and in fact rules well, she is something of a caretaker of a patriarchy.

“I am most anxious to enlist everyone who can speak or write to join in checking this mad, wicked folly of ‘Women’s Rights’, with all its attendant horrors, on which her poor feeble sex is bent, forgetting every sense of womanly feelings and propriety. Feminists ought to get a good whipping. Were woman to ‘unsex’ themselves by claiming equality with men, they would become the most hateful, heathen and disgusting of beings and would surely perish without male protection.”

Queen Victoria (1819-1901), ruler of the British Empire at its peak.

Apparently, if there ever was a matriarchy, it collapsed so fast that no historical record of it was left.

There have always ever been good patriarchies, and bad ones.

An increase in the influence of women in public life has often been associated with national decline. The later Romans complained that, although Rome ruled the world, women ruled Rome. In the tenth century, a similar tendency was observable in the Arab Empire, the women demanding admission to the professions hitherto monopolised by men. ‘What,’ wrote the contemporary historian, Ibn Bessam, ‘have the professions of clerk, tax-collector or preacher to do with women? These occupations have always been limited to men alone.’ Many women practised law, while others obtained posts as university professors. There was an agitation for the appointment of female judges, which, however, does not appear to have succeeded.

Soon after this period, government and public order collapsed, and foreign invaders overran the country. The resulting increase in confusion and violence made it unsafe for women to move unescorted in the streets, with the result that this feminist movement collapsed.

Published by proprietor

Happily married, with children.

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